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  • A Missouri S&T student leaps over Volcán de Agua.

  • The school in Quetzalito, Izabal had a rainwater collection system provided by relief organization Comitato Internationale Per Lo Svluppo Dei Popli (CISP)

  • The department, or state, of Izabal is home to the United Fruit Company, and mile after mile of banana plantations.

  • Students had the opportunity to learn about the history of Guatemala during class. Here they visit the ruins of the capital of the Cakchiquel Maya at Iximche.

  • The students had a chance to practice their Spanish language skills when they interviewed filter users in Tecpan, Chimaltenango.

  • Students present the results of their on-campus experiments to the inventor of the modern ceramic pot filter, Fernando Mazariegos.

  • Students built an apparatus to continually supply water to a series of filters. The goal of the experiment was to characterize the quantity of water that could be treated by the filters before the production rate dropped so low that consumers would stop using the filters.

  • Large concrete sinks served several purposes in the Mayan Highlands, including washing, bathing, and water storage. Note that Geological engineering students are significantly taller than the typical indigenous person.

  • The climate in Antigua is moderate year-round. Houses are not heated or cooled and the high elevation reduces the potential for mosquitoes so window screens are not used.

  • Working in another country sometimes requires learning another language. Here Geological Engineering students take Spanish lessons in the outdoor classrooms at Proyecto Linguistico Francisco Marroquin in Antigua.

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